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U.S. Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson to speak in Rapid City

U.S. Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson to speak in Rapid City

College of Arts and Sciences

Secretary of the U.S. Air Force Heather Wilson will deliver a major lecture in Rapid City on June 25. Sponsored by the Classics Institute at Dakota State University, the secretary will speak on “Computers and War”— examining the changes brought to warfare by the technology revolution.

Dakota State will hold the event at the Journey Museum as part of “The Cultural Consequences of Computers,” a lecture series the Classics Institute has arranged around the state, with funding from the South Dakota Humanities Council, Dakota State, and private donors. The series hosts speakers on topics from law to art, business, and news to speak about transformations during the 40 years of the computer revolution.

In her lecture, Secretary Wilson will consider military power and engagement, as these have developed in our age of digitization, according to Dr. Joseph Bottum, director of the Classics Institute. The event, Bottum stated, is an astonishingly important opportunity to hear a senior military official contemplating the uses of Artificial Intelligence, smart weapons, and instant communications in an underdeveloped area of military ethics and just-war theory.

The lecture is free and open to the public, but seating is limited. Media representatives are invited to attend.

EVENT DETAILS

Who: Heather Wilson, secretary of the U.S. Air Force.

What: Lecture on “Computers and War,” sponsored by DSU’s Classics Institute

Where: Journey Museum, 222 New York St., Rapid City, SD 57701

When: Monday, June 25, 7 p.m.

Interview Email Contacts: Joseph Bottum at Dakota State, Michael Martin at the U.S. Air Force.

Heather Wilson is the 24th Secretary of the Air Force. A graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy and the University of Oxford, she has served as a U.S. Representative and president of the S.D. School of Mines.

The Classics Institute is one of the new MadLabs at Dakota State University, directed by Joseph Bottum and dedicated to exploring the good and the ill of our digitized world.